Azores, 1800nm East of Bermuda and 1300nm west of France


 
 StarrVoyage 2003
Florida to Bermuda to The Azores to the Atlantic Coast of Europe
 


Our first stop in the Azores
Horta, Azores Our first stop in the Azores
Painting on the dock is encouraged in Horta.  We were short on talent but gave it our best.
Painting on the dock is encouraged in Horta. We were short on talent but gave it our best.
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Friends pull in from Vancouver on SURGAMIO
Superior talent by far!
Superior talent by far!
Here is real talent!
Here is real talent!
Terciera is a small agricurtural community with friendly and maybe sometimes lonely folks.  They all seem like they want to take you home with them!
TERCIERA, AZORES Terciera is a small agricurtural community with friendly and maybe sometimes lonely folks. They all seem like they want to take you home with them!
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Definitely a dairy producing country
Definitely a dairy producing country
La Rochelle, Bay of Biscay, France
Preparing to enter the leaky Locks of La Rochelle
The Prison Tower and Gate Tower Preparing to enter the leaky Locks of La Rochelle
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While we were a mile out, a speedboat came toward us with folks waving their hands and shouting.  The skipper kindly explained (in understandable english) that we were at great risk of grounding!  We thanked him for his concern and told them that we had local knowledge from some sailor friends and the we thought we could carefully make the entry!
These charts show depths in feet. For about 2nm on the approach to get into the basin we had to go in on a rising tide. When the tide is out there is nothing but mudflats. While we were a mile out, a speedboat came toward us with folks waving their hands and shouting. The skipper kindly explained (in understandable english) that we were at great risk of grounding! We thanked him for his concern and told them that we had local knowledge from some sailor friends and the we thought we could carefully make the entry!
Once in the basin the bridge closes as well as the lock gates close.  When the tide goes out we are left in a virtual bathtub with dry mudflats outside of the locks.
Entering the Basin Once in the basin the bridge closes as well as the lock gates close. When the tide goes out we are left in a virtual bathtub with dry mudflats outside of the locks.
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Saying goodby to our Atlantic passage shipmates Dennis and Roxann Reeser
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Our intention was to stay for a few days and then head down coast toward Spain but we needed fresh provisions.
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We were blown away with the markets just a 5 minute walk down the dock and into the city.
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The Bay of Biscay is about 300nm from Britany in the North to Spain in the South and has 20ft tides.  The boating is done primarily the French in sailboats under 35ft.  
We cruised up and down the bay going into multiple rivers where if you looked at the charts you'd think it was impossible to navigate.
 If we saw a 35ft sailboat with a 6ft draft running up the river then we knew we could make it as well.
Invariable when we wanted to go into a new harbor and we called the port captain, the Capitainerie would ask about the boat specifications and when I would say the boat was 22 met and 100 tonnes..the normal response would be impossible! impossible!

We would come into his harbor anyway and invariably when we get there and maybe anchor right in front of his facility the captain would come out to the boat and tell us he liked the boat and do please come in and stay.  
Bay of Biscay
Fall, Winter & Spring Cruising

The Bay of Biscay is about 300nm from Britany in the North to Spain in the South and has 20ft tides.  
The tides are very large and most boats go into basins where the lock gates can be closed keeping the boats inside floating but those outside the gates go high and dry.Starr locked inside of the basin so the boats don't go high and dry when the tide goes out.The boating is done primarily the French in sailboats mostly under 35ft.  

We cruised up and down the bay going into multiple rivers where if you looked at the charts you'd think it was impossible to navigate. If we saw a sailboat or any boat for that matter with a 6ft draft running up the river then we knew we could make it as well.
Entering the Vilaine River. Just enough room to clear the dinghies!Currents run up to five knots in the river.Estates along the Vilaine RiverThe French are passionate about their sailing.Invariably when we wanted to go into a new harbor and we called the Port Captain, the Capitainerie would ask about the boat specifications and when I would say the boat was 22 meters and 100 tons..the normal response would be impossible! impossible!
San Martin, Ille de Re. We had to back into this basin and then the locks closed and we were kept afloat inside.We would come into his harbor anyway and invariably when we get there and maybe anchor right in front of his facility the Port Captain would come out to the boat and tell us he liked the boat and do please come in and stay.